Congress firm on Telangana decision: Digvijay Singh

Thursday, Sep 26, 2013, 20:15 IST | Agency: IANS

Congress general secretary Digvijaya Singh Thursday said the party leadership was firm on its decision to carve out separate Telangana and made it clear that there would be no going back.

He told reporters in the national capital that the concerns raised by people of Seemandhra (Rayalaseema and coastal Andhra) would be addressed in the draft bill.

He reiterated that the union home ministry was drafting Telangana resolution and hinted that the same may be put submitted to the cabinet in the first week of October.

Appealing to people of Seemandhra to live in harmony as they had been doing, he said a political decision to bifurcate the state was taken after due consultations with all sections of society and political parties.

“The decision was taken after near consensus among political parties. Let us not go back. It is easy for regional parties to go back but a party like Congress with great heritage and history can’t go back on a decision,” he said.

He was referring to Telugu Desam Party (TDP) and YSR Congress party taking a u-turn to oppose the decision.

“We are firm on the decision taken on popular demand. As far as the issues raised by people of Seemandhra like sharing of river water, capital, revenue, education, employment and division of cadre are concerned, they can be discussed when draft bill is prepared,” he said.

He said A.K. Antony committee was looking into the issues and its suggestions would be incorporated in the draft bill.

When his attention was drawn to Chief Minister N. Kiran Kumar Reddy’s statement that the concerns of Seemandhra people were important than the party, Digvijaya reminded him that he is the chief minister of the whole of Andhra Pradesh and not just Seemandhra.

What we need to watch out for in case of Hyderabad

By Sujai Karampuri

1. It has become evident by now that Samaikyandhra Movement has clear agenda – to stop the formation of Telangana – not because it has love or affection for Telangana, but to make sure Seemandhras don’t lose Hyderabad.

2. If Telangana is to be formed, they want to make sure Hyderabad remains with Seemandhra, if not in short term, but in the long term.

3. The key step in that direction, of keeping Hyderabad for Seemandhras, is the common capital.

4. We have only seen only two methods followed when creating states. One, creation of successor states with their own capital cities without any territory in joint ownership. Two, creation of successor states with common administrative zones with the only example of Chandigarh, which was created as union territory to serve as joint-capital for Punjab and Haryana.

5. There are many peculiarities unique to Chandigarh:

a. It is one of the very few planned cities in India. The administrators choose a piece of land and decided to build a city there. Most other cities of Independent India have had long cultural and geographical histories.

b. Chandigarh is geographically right on the border for both Punjab and Haryana.

c. Chandigarh started off as temporary joint-capital for Punjab and Haryana. After ten years it was decided to be given to Punjab, but that never happened.

d. Chandigarh remains stagnant, and shows no promise of growth. Chandigarh does not rank anywhere close to a growing city. Whereas cities like Bangalore, Pune and Hyderabad attract industry and employment and swell in population.

e. Chandigarh is ruled by a Lieutenant General appointed by President. He is not an elected representative. Therefore the electoral democracy which we value so much in our country is missing in that city. Many local leaders of Chandigarh bemoan their current condition. They demand that they should forgo their union territory status to become a regular city as part of one of the states.

f. It is a common trend in India for union territories to become states, not the reverse. Even New Delhi started out as Union Territory to become a state.

6. Chandigarh is not the best example for Hyderabad. Hyderabad does not share a border with Seemandhra.

7. Making a city with rich and historical democratic experience of electing MLAs, MPs and councilors, into a union territory is a retrograde step if we were to strip off these democratic institutions keeping such a large population under a Lieutenant General.

8. Another model that is being suggested is that of New Delhi, where the authority on law & order and land is held by Union Government. Such an arrangement could suit New Delhi because it happens to be the capital city of entire country, but not for Hyderabad. No similar arrangement has ever been mooted for individual states so far.

9. No state so far has allowed the Union Government to take over law & order within its borders.

a. Implicit in agreeing to give away the authority of law & order to Union Government is that the new state is not a responsible state that can protect its citizens.

b. Implicit in this agreement is that the new state will be discriminatory and unfair. Such an accusation even before the state is formed is quite demeaning and insulting. It shows that while all other states, from Nagaland to Jharkhand are seen as responsible states, the new state of Telangana is being treated as immature and a rogue state.

c. Telangana will the first such state in India where it is not entrusted with the responsibility of securing security and protection to all the citizens living within its borders. Even when riots broke down in Mumbai against Tamils or Biharis, the Union Government did not take away the responsibility of law & order from Maharasthra. The same is true with Bangalore even Tamil or North East population were targeted. So, why is Telangana an exception?

d. Every effort has to be made to completely reject this idea.

10. No state so far has allowed the Union Government to take over the administration of land.

a. Is it not clear that this is another attempt of Seemandhras to make sure their illegal grabbing continues even after formation of Telangana?

b. So, why should Telangana accept it?

11. Accepting a common capital for a city like Hyderabad does not make any sense. It has no precedent in the history of India.

12. Seemandhras have to start working out of their capital city from day one after the formation of Telangana. Some people ask how that is possible. Well, it was possible for nearly 16 states so far.

a. Whenever states were bifurcated, the states which did not have the erstwhile capital city converted an existing city into a capital city.

b. Jharkhand started functioning out of Ranchi, Chhattisgarh out of Raipur, Kerala out Trivandrum, and Andhra State operated out of Kurnool.

c. Not all capital cities have to metropolitan and cosmopolitan cities. There are only few metropolitan cities in this country while there are many more states. Obviously not all states will get a metropolitan city in their geography.

d. Right now Seemandhras already have many cities in their region which can be used as a capital city.

e. Vijayawada, Guntur, Vizag, Tirupathi, etc., are not very different from Bhubaneswar or Bhopal or Guwahati.

13. Telanganas should not accept common capital, not even for a single minute. Accepting it could become another Gentlemen’s Agreement, a noose around their neck. We may end up losing Hyderabad in the long run.

14. In the worst case scenario, if we have to live with common capital for ten years, then we should make sure that ten districts along with all their constituencies are defined as part of Telangana without sharing any of its constituencies with Seemandhras.

a. We have to make sure Seemandhra does not have claim even on a single constituency that belongs to Telangana.

b. We should allow Seemandhras to operate the facilities and capital infrastructure only. That is only limited to Saifabad mandal.

c. We cannot give them power or jurisdiction over revenue, land, or law & order.

d. Seemandhras cannot have any role or representation in GHMC or HMDA.

Are we being naïve about joint-capital?

By Sujai K.

Most of us are NOT sure what it actually means to be a joint-capital.

1. Is it going to be another Gentlemen’s Agreement, a noose around our neck that would take sixty years to extricate from?

a. We entered into that agreement in 1956 thinking it would protect our interests. But history is a testament to our naiveté. Are we seeing another blunder in action?

2. A bill for formation of state has to clearly specify capital cities for the states being created, in this case two states – Telangana and Seemandhra. If the bill says that Hyderabad is going to be joint-capital for these two new states, then is it possible ever to create a new capital city for Seemandhra in future?

a. The only precedent we have in the history for joint-capital is that of Chandigarh which started off as a 10 year experiment and then became a permanent capital. Madras and Mumbai did not allow for joint-capital – for right reasons.

b. There is no constitutional provision to create a new capital city for a state by the Parliament other than introducing the bill in the parliament which creates these states. So, if Hyderabad is named the capital city for Seemandhra in the bill, will it not become a permanent entity?

c. There is a chance that Seemandhra will go to Supreme Court to keep extending the 10-year period into indefinite period.

d. Should Parliament pass another bill to create a new capital city for Seemandhra?

3. Will joint-capital mean special administrative zones for Seemandhra?

a. Will Seemandhras have special administrative zones for their capital within in Hyderabad? If so, this is going to the first of its kind in India. And there is no provision in Indian Constitution or legal framework to strip them of these administrative zones once created.

4. Will joint-capital mean representation in GHMC/HMDA?

a. What if Seemandhras maneuver to get their proportionate representation in GHMC/HMDA? Once they get, there is no way to get them out. They will be majority once again. Hyderabad is practically lost.

5. Will joint-capital mean sharing revenues from Hyderabad?

a. There is no precedent where one state generates revenues from lands that do not belong to it. If the revenues are shared, it automatically means Hyderabad belongs to Seemandhra. There is no way to extricate ourselves from such a setup.

6. Will joint-capital mean certain legislative seats for Seemandhra in their administrative zones?

a. If this happens, Seemandhras will have Hyderabad as permanent capital.

b. There is no clear definition in Indian Constitution to define whether the capital city should be within geographical limits of the state or not. A state could have its capital city anywhere in India. Though practically it has never made sense, Seemandhras may be quite OK to have their capital city in another state.

7. Telanganas are believing that a joint-capital is not practically feasible for Seemandhras. What if that is not the case?

a. What if joint-capital is actually in the best interest of Seemandhras for the following reasons.

i. It will keep Coastal Andhra and Rayalaseema united against the common enemy Telangana. Delaying formation of a separate capital forever, beyond 10 years, will be in the best interests for keeping Seemandhra united.

ii. Winning administrative zones, or seats into GHMC/HMDA with an influencing power, will win brownie points with Seemandhra people.

iii. A Seemandhra political party which gives up Hyderabad will commit political suicide – and therefore no political party will allow for it.

b. What if joint-capital is actually the case of an aborted baby for Telanganas? What if we are actually winning a battle but losing the war? What if it is a Pyrrhic victory wherein we get the state but lose our capital city?

WHAT STEPS CAN BE TAKEN UNDER THE LAW UNDER WHICH WE CAN AUTHORIZE ONE STATE GOVT TO OVERSEE LAW & ORDER PROBLEM IN ANY OTHER STATE CAPITAL

By T.L.N.REDDY

The Central Government is constrained by the Constitution to not make any laws with respect to any matter for a part of a State as stated below in the Constitution.

246. Subject-matter of laws made by Parliament and by the Legislatures of States.
(4) Parliament has power to make laws with respect to any matter for
any part of the territory of India not included in a State notwithstanding that such matter is a matter enumerated in the State List.

And, per the Seventh Schedule, there is Union List and a States list of Powers vested in the respective governments as follows:

SEVENTH SCHEDULE
(Article 246)

List I—Union List

2A. Deployment of any armed force of the Union or any other force
subject to the control of the Union or any contingent or unit thereof in any State
in aid of the civil power; powers, jurisdiction, privileges and liabilities of the
members of such forces while on such deployment.

80. Extension of the powers and jurisdiction of members of a police force
belonging to any State to any area outside that State, but not so as to enable the
police of one State to exercise powers and jurisdiction in any area outside that
State without the consent of the Government of the State in which such area is
situated; extension of the powers and jurisdiction of members of a police force
belonging to any State to railway areas outside that State.

Given these constraints, making Hyderabad a joint capital for two States is wrought with serious risks of violating the Constitution although some exceptions are allowed in the Constitution as stated below. Of course, the consent of both States is required. Hyderabad is an integral part of Telangana State and is its capital as clarified by the resolutions passed by CWC, UPA, and the Cabinet. It is to be noted that Hyderabad is outside the domain (jurisdiction of Andhra Pradesh). If Hyderabad is to serve as joint capital temporarily for some time, then the State of Andhra Pradesh will have to surrender its jurisdiction over its capital (joint) to the State of Telangana so that the complete control and administrative authority is vested in Telangana. This is the only way to make it (joint capital) work. The Parliament may, after obtaining the consent of Andhra Pradesh State, pass a law conferring complete authority and administrative control of the joint capital to Telangana State. After the stipulated time, Hyderabad will revert back to being the exclusive capital of Telangana State. In effect, Andhra Pradesh State will be granted only the permission to use the infrastructure and facilities in the designated areas of Hyderabad city by Telangana State without any administrative rights.

Even with these arrangements, there remain other problems such as locating the offices of the Governor of Andhra Pradesh within Hyderabad. Essentially, the governor of Andhra Pradesh also will be a renter of infrastructure and facilities. The Governor of AP will have no jurisdiction over Hyderabad in any capacity. So also will the chief Minister and his cabinet.

This is the only way out to allow Andhra Pradesh State to operate from joint the capital city located outside its borders.

The Constitution does not confer any provisions for a joint capital for two States when the joint capital is physically located outside the borders of another State.

252. Power of Parliament to legislate for two or more States by consent and adoption of such legislation by any other State.

—(1) If it appears to the Legislatures of two or more States to be desirable that any of the matters with respect to which Parliament has no power to make laws for the States except as provided in articles 249 and 250 should be regulated in such States by Parliament by law, and if resolutions to that effect are passed by all the Houses of the Legislatures of those States, it shall be lawful for Parliament to pass an act for regulating that matter accordingly, and any Act so passed shall apply to such States and to any other State by which it is adopted afterwards by resolution passed in that behalf by the House or, where there are two Houses, by each of the Houses of the Legislature of that State.

257. Control of the Union over States in certain cases .—(1) The executive power of every State shall be so exercised as not to impede or prejudice the exercise of the executive power of the Union, and the executive power of the Union shall extend to the giving of such directions to a State as may appear to the Government of Indi
a to be necessary for that purpose.

258. Power of the Union to confer powers, etc., on States in certain
cases.
—(1) Notwithstanding anything in this Constitution, the President may,
with the consent of the Government of a State, entrust either conditionally or unconditionally to that Government or to its officers functions in relation to any matter to which the executive power of the Union extends.

131
(2) A law made by Parliament which applies in any State may,
notwithstanding that it relates to a matter with respect to which the Legislature of the State has no power to make laws, confer powers and impose duties, or authorise the conferring of powers and the imposition of duties, upon the State or officers and authorities thereof.

PERTINENT PARTS OF
THE CONSTITUTION OF INDIA

SEVENTH SCHEDULE
(Article 246)

List I—Union List

2A. Deployment of any armed force of the Union or any other force
subject to the control of the Union or any contingent or unit thereof in any State
in aid of the civil power; powers, jurisdiction, privileges and liabilities of the
members of such forces while on such deployment.

80. Extension of the powers and jurisdiction of members of a police force
belonging to any State to any area outside that State, but not so as to enable the
police of one State to exercise powers and jurisdiction in any area outside that
State without the consent of the Government of the State in which such area is
situated; extension of the powers and jurisdiction of members of a police force
belonging to any State to railway areas outside that State.

List II—State List

1. Public order (but not including the use of any naval, military or air force
or any other armed force of the Union or of any other force subject to the
control of the Union or of any contingent or unit thereof in aid of the civil
power).
2. Police (including railway and village police) subject to the provisions of
entry 2A of List I.

3. Officers and servants of the High Court; procedure in rent and revenue
courts; fees taken in all courts except the Supreme Court.
4. Prisons, reformatories, Borstal institutions and other institutions of a
like nature, and persons detained therein;arrangements with other States for the
use of prisons and other institutions.
THE CONSTITUTION OF INDIA 271
5. Local government, that is to say, the constitution and powers of
municipal corporations, improvement trusts, districts boards, mining settlement
authorities and other local authorities for the purpose of local self-government
or village administration.
6. Public health and sanitation; hospitals and dispensaries.
7. Pilgrimages, other than pilgrimages to places outside India.
8. Intoxicating liquors, that is to say, the production, manufacture,
possession, transport, purchase and sale of intoxicating liquors.
9. Relief of the disabled and unemployable.
10. Burials and burial grounds; cremations and cremation grounds.
* * * * *
12. Libraries, museums and other similar institutions controlled or
financed by the State; ancient and historical monuments and records other than
those declared by or under law madeby Parliament to be of national
importance.
13. Communications, that is to say, roads, bridges, ferries, and other
means of communication not specified in List I; municipal tramways;
ropeways; inland waterways and traffic thereon subject to the provisions of List
I and List III with regard to such waterways; vehicles other than mechanically
propelled vehicles.
14. Agriculture, including agricultural education and research, protection
against pests and prevention of plant diseases.
15. Preservation, protection and improvement of stock and prevention of
animal diseases; veterinary training and practice.
16. Pounds and the prevention of cattle trespass.
17. Water, that is to say, water supplies, irrigation and canals, drainage
and embankments, water storage and water power subject to the provisions of
entry 56 of List I.
18. Land, that is to say, rights in or over land, land tenures including the
relation of landlord and tenant, and the collection of rents; transfer and
alienation of agricultural land; land improvement and agricultural loans;
colonization.
* * * *
THE CONSTITUTION OF INDIA 272
21.Fisheries.
22. Courts of wards subject to the provisions of entry 34 of List I;
encumbered and attached estates.
23. Regulation of mines and mineral development subject to the
provisions of List I with respect toregulation and development under the
control of the Union.
24. Industries subject to the provisionsof entries 7 and 52 of List I.
25. Gas and gas-works.
26. Trade and commerce within the State subject to the provisions of entry
33 of List III.
27. Production, supply and distribution of goods subject to the provisions
of entry 33 of List III.
28. Markets and fairs.
* * * * *
30. Money-lending and money-lenders; relief of agricultural indebtedness.
31. Inns and inn-keepers.
32. Incorporation, regulation and winding up of corporations, other than
those specified in List I, and universities; unincorporated trading, literary,
scientific, religious and other societies and associations; co-operative societies.
33. Theatres and dramatic performances; cinemas subject to the provisions
of entry 60 of List I; sports, entertainments and amusements.
34. Betting and gambling.
35. Works, lands and buildings vested in or in the possession of the State.
* * * * *
37. Elections to the Legislature of the State subject to the provisions of
any law made by Parliament.
38. Salaries and allowances of members of the Legislature of the State, of
the Speaker and Deputy Speaker of the Legislative Assembly and, if there is a
Legislative Council, of the Chairman and Deputy Chairman thereof.
39. Powers, privileges and immunities ofthe Legislative Assembly and of
the members and the committees thereof, and, if there is a Legislative Council,
of that Council and of the members and the committees thereof; enforcement of
attendance of persons for giving evidence or producing documents before
committees of the Legislature of the State.
THE CONSTITUTION OF INDIA 273
40. Salaries and allowances of Ministers for the State.
41. State public services; State Public Service Commission.
42. State pensions, that is to say, pensions payable by the State or out of
the Consolidated Fund of the State.
43. Public debt of the State.
44. Treasure trove.
45. Land revenue, including the assessment and collection of revenue, the
maintenance of land records, survey for revenue purposes and records of rights,
and alienation of revenues.
46. Taxes on agricultural income.
47. Duties in respect of succession to agricultural land.
48. Estate duty in respect of agricultural land.
49. Taxes on lands and buildings.
50. Taxes on mineral rights subjectto any limitations imposed by
Parliament by law relating to mineral development.
51. Duties of excise on the following goods manufactured or produced in
the State and countervailing duties at the same or lower rates on similar goods
manufactured or produced elsewhere in India:—
(a) alcoholic liquors for human consumption;
(b) opium, Indian hemp and other narcotic drugs and narcotics,
but not including medicinal and toilet preparations containing alcohol or any
substance included in sub-paragraph (b) of this entry.
52. Taxes on the entry of goods into a local area for consumption, use or
sale therein.
53. Taxes on the consumption or sale of electricity.
54. Taxes on the sale or purchase of goods other than newspapers, subject
to the provisions of entry 92A of List I.
55. Taxes on advertisements other than advertisements published in the
newspapers and advertisements broadcast by radio or television.
56. Taxes on goods and passengers carried by road or on inland
waterways.
THE CONSTITUTION OF INDIA 274
57. Taxes on vehicles, whether mechanically propelled or not, suitable for
use on roads, including tramcars subject to the provisions of entry 35 of List III.
58. Taxes on animals and boats.
59. Tolls.
60. Taxes on professions, trades, callings and employments.
61. Capitation taxes.
62. Taxes on luxuries, including taxes on entertainments, amusements,
betting and gambling.
63. Rates of stamp duty in respect of documents other than those specified
in the provisions of List I with regard to rates of stamp duty.
64. Offences against laws with respect to any of the matters in this List.
65. Jurisdiction and powers of all courts, except the Supreme Court, with
respect to any of the matters in this List.
66. Fees in respect of any of the matters in this List, but not including fees
taken in any court.

PART XI
RELATIONS BETWEEN THE UNION AND THE STATES
CHAPTER I.—LEGISLATIVE RELATIONS
Distribution of Legislative Powers

246. Subject-matter of laws made by Parliament and by the
Legislatures of States.
(4) Parliament has power to make laws with respect to any matter for
any part of the territory of India not included in a State notwithstanding that such matter is a matter enumerated in the State List.

252. Power of Parliament to legislate for two or more States by
consent and adoption of such legislation by any other State.

—(1) If it appears to the Legislatures of two or more States to be desirable that any of the matters with respect to which Parliament has no power to make laws for the States except as provided in articles 249 and 250 should be regulated in such States by Parliament by law, and if resolutions to that effect are passed by all the Houses of the Legislatures of those States, it shall be lawful for Parliament to pass an act for regulating that matter accordingly, and any Act so passed shall apply to such States and to any other State by which it is adopted afterwards by resolution passed in that behalf by the House or, where there are two Houses, by each of the Houses of the Legislature of that State.

257. Control of the Union over States in certain cases .—(1) The executive power of every State shall be so exercised as not to impede or
prejudice the exercise of the executive power of the Union, and the executive power of the Union shall extend to the giving of such directions to a State as may appear to the Government of Indi
a to be necessary for that purpose.

258. Power of the Union to confer powers, etc., on States in certain
cases.
—(1) Notwithstanding anything in this Constitution, the President may,
with the consent of the Government of a State, entrust either conditionally or unconditionally to that Government or to its officers functions in relation to any matter to which the executive power of the Union extends.

131
(2) A law made by Parliament which applies in any State may,
notwithstanding that it relates to a matter with respect to which the Legislature of the State has no power to make laws, confer powers and impose duties, or authorise the conferring of powers and the imposition of duties, upon the State or officers and authorities thereof.

Who is there to pacify people in Seemandhra?

Culprit is Congress

Congress is failing to give an unified effort to pacify Seemandhra people. It’s in disarray. Government is looking passively to the happenings in Seemandhra. Police is behaving most democratically with the people, who are agitating. No party functionary in a mood to persuade the people. They were competing with other parties in fighting a decision by Central government.

There is no leader in the Seemandhra Congress, ironically everybody became the followers of the masses. After dragging the Telangana issue for nine years and many futile consultation processes, Congress failed to convince its own party leaders. It’s purely Congress failure.

It’s failure of Congress high command and leadership. Senseless deferments and delay tactics made the situation worse. Congress might have prepared for division during all these years. They might have given enough signals to them. Instead of that the party played with it.The first culprit in this entire episode is Congress high command. When heads become weak, the tails run the show.

TDP, YSRCP opportunist ways and moves are expected. They are in opposition. Certainly they wants to take advantage in Seemandhra. They are waiting for it. But how can Congress play that way? How come Seemandhra leaders get away from Party line? Now Seemandhra people need a bold leader who can assure a bright future and assurance. Who is there?

Yes, What KCR told is simple and hard fact!

Seemandhra Establishment playing every murky game to blame Telangana cause and to obstruct the decision. What KCR told is a simple thing and known fact of any division of State. It is a casual comment, may be an untimely one. There is nothing in it to be called a threat.

One can go through the proceedings of Meghalaya, Chathisgarh, Uttarakhand and Jarkhand and find out, how the staff was allocated. Here I am giving that part of staff allocation.

When the state of Meghalaya was formed United Assam capital gone to new state. Assam established its new capital at on the outskirts of Guahati, called Dispur. Then 70% of state Government employees were transferred to new capital.

Here is the principle how the allocation was done-

‘The posts of the un-divided State are allocated between the successor States in a specific ratio arrived by the State Advisory Committee, keeping in view the posts relatable to the area of the successor State (field posts) and also a fixed percentage of Hqrs. Posts. The posts located in the geographical area, go to the successor States, whereas the posts of the headquarter are distributed in the ratio of the districts.’

Not only this, every illegal and irregular appointment, done by Seemandhra establishment have to be reviewed and rectified. All the Government orders passed to identify and rectify irregularities were issued by none other than Seemandhra Chief Ministers.

Kasu B Reddy issued 34 GO, where as NTR issued 610 GO. Chandrababu Naidu appointed Girglani commission. All these orders and reports should be implemented in right spirit. Telangana protagonists expect nothing more than this or nothing less than this.

There nothing in KCR’s comment to worry about. It’s a mere flurry created by venomous Seemandhra media.

PROCESS OF ALLOCATION

(a) Framing of guidelines on Reorganization
The Reorganization Acts only provide for the brief outlines and fundamental principles of reorganization. It was therefore, necessary to work out the modalities and frame the detailed guidelines to carry out the reorganization process. Accordingly, a meeting was convened on 06.09.2000 under the chairmanship of the then Secretary(Personnel), Govt. Of India, in which the Chief Secretaries of the Reorganized States, participated. As per decisions taken in the meeting, basic guidelines to regulate the process of reorganization, were issued under D.O. letter dt. 13.09.2000 in order to carry out provisional allocation of employees, till they are finally allocated.
(b) Constitution of State Advisory Committee
The Reorganization Acts provide for setting up of advisory committee(s) to assist the Central Govt. in the reorganization process. Subsequent to issue of the basic guidelines, the Central Govt. decided to constitute State Advisory Committees to assist it in the reorganization process. It laid down the manner in which the committee was to be constituted and fixed the time frame for it to follow in the D.O. letter dt. 22.12.2000. State Advisory Committees (SAC) were constituted with a senior retired civil servant of the rank of Chief Secretary or equivalent as Chairman with Chief Secretaries of the successor States as Members to assist the Central Government to discharge of its functions with regard to allocation of State Government employees, as provided in the Re-organisation Act. However, it was left to the State Advisory Committees to formulate the detailed and State specific guidelines for allocation of employees between the successor States.
(c) Ratio of allocation of posts
The posts of the un-divided State are allocated between the successor States in a specific ratio arrived by the State Advisory Committee, keeping in view the posts relatable to the area of the successor State (field posts) and also a fixed percentage of Hqrs. Posts. The posts located in the geographical area, go to the successor States, whereas the posts of the headquarter are distributed in the ratio of the districts.
(d) Allocation of Personnel
Personnel and vacancies are allocated between the successor States in accordance with the ratio finalised by the State Advisory Committee by applying relevant provisions as existed on the appointed day.
(e) Finalisation of TFAL & RFAL
Based on the information provided by the concerned Administrative Departments, the State Advisory Committee issues Tentative Final Allocation List (TFAL) enlisting employees proposed for allocation on option, domicile and juniority basis, inviting objections from the employees. The objections received against TFAL within one month period are considered by the State Advisory Committee as per guidelines. The Committee recommends the Revised Final Allocation List (RFAL) to the Central Government for consideration.
(f) Final Allocation
Based on the recommendations of the State Advisory Committee and after ensuring that the recommendations are as per the Guidelines on Reorganization, the Central Government issues final allocation of personnel between the successor States.